D ow n lo ad the B a s s
app for extra co n te n t
APP EXTRA
ADVANCED THEORY
TUITION
EXAMPLE 6
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EXAMPLE 7
EXAMPLE 8
number 3 can represent either the ring or little finger; the index finger is always indicated by the number 1 (see
last month's column for more on this).
So what if we wanted to expand these three-note patterns into four-note patterns by throwing either a hammer-
on or a pull-off into the fray? We can use the left-hand patterns that use all four fingers, as shown in the table in
Example 3
. If we combine these with the raking patterns shown in
Example 1
, and include a hammer-on or pull-off
where appropriate, we can generate numerous new patterns. To list all the sets of these newly generated patterns
would take several pages, but by demonstrating how you can develop these ideas, you will be able to explore them
for yourself and pick ones you particularly like.
For example, let's take group A of the four-note left-hand fingering patterns shown in
Example 3
. By combining
these patterns with Ai of
Example 1
we can generate the ideas demonstrated in
Example 4
. The right-hand
fingering is constant and it is only the left hand that changes with each new configuration of the left hand. The
hammer-ons and pull-offs are
dependent on whether the two
consecutive notes, where they
occur, are ascending or descending.
The placement of the hammer-
ons and pull-offs can occur either
from the third note in the pattern
to the fourth note, as in
Example
4
, or they could be placed from
the second note to the third as in
Example 5
.
Both
Example 4
and
Example 5
use the same notes, but where the
hammer-on or pull-off occurs gives
them a slightly different flavour.
This highlights the benefits of using
phrases such as the ones shown
here, they have a distinctive, almost
vocal quality that can be absent
when simply picking all the notes.
There is also the added bonus that
with the combination of raking,
hammer-ons and pull-offs, you can
develop some very fast motifs.
Example 6
demonstrates how
you can get even more variations
from one single pattern by simply
shifting its placement against the
pulse. The pattern shown here in
the first bar starts out using a left-
hand fingering of 2, 1, 4, 3, which
is the final variation of group B in
Example 3
. The right-hand raking
pattern is Bii, as shown in
Example
1
, and the hammer-on is from the
second note to the third in the
pattern. By choosing a different
note of the pattern to start the
sequence with, we discover all the
possible permutations.
Example 7
demonstrates another
approach to using both raking and
hammer-ons/pull-offs in a pattern
by adding a dead note into the
sequence. The first three bars show
how you can use the same basic
pattern but on different parts of the
scale. The final bar of this example
shows how you can vary the upper
note of the pattern.
Example 8
demonstrates how you can shift
these patterns up and down the
fingerboard by using the same
strings but shifting position for
each successive phrase.
Next month I will be extending
the idea of combining hammer-
ons and pull-offs with raking by
including scale fragments.
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• Improved Performance
• Enhanced Playing Experience
О
Д
/ f a t f r
• Extended and Refined Range • Great Tone - Long Life
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&
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