BASSISTS REVEAL ERE TRICKS Of THEIR TRADE
FASTER THAN A SNAPPING D STRING
GEAR
DEREK BOLIVIAN. SWORN IN
I don't really know if I have a normal bass style: I just try to
have fun and do whatever communicates the emotions of the
songs to the crowd. I take a lot of influence from the late Paul
Gray and the rest of Slipknot, but try to include hip-hop styles
to make it my own. I play a five-string bass. I used to hate five-
string neck width, but now I've grown to appreciate the playing
variety that a five-string provides. I slap more live than on the
albums, but there are quite a few slap and pop parts thrown in
for dissonance and to accent certain beats. The secret of playing
bass well is practice. A lot. Any style as long as you're playing.
And keep pushing your limits and practise things that are hard
for you or that you think sound sick. My first bass was a black
Dean Z that my parents found used online. It sounded awful
but it inspired me to make music my career. The greatest bass
player that ever lived is Roger Waters. He had some of the
most memorable and inspiring bass-lines in my listening career,
and made me appreciate the diversity that a bass has. Our new
album,
The L overs/T he Devil,
is out now.
www.facebook.com/sworninband
GEAR
BASSES
EFFECTS
AM PS
CHRiS GRAMAZiO
I never really learned a lot of covers, but I listened to a lot
of players. I'd like to think that because of that, and perhaps
through some form of bass-osmosis, I was able to develop my
own style, a sort of progressive rock/ultra funk if you will. I've
been a four-stringer since day one, it's always felt like enough. I
think frets are the real discussion, do you need more than 20? I
remember my first bass very well. I bought it at Manny's in New
York with my mom and uncle (my uncle was one of the reasons I
started playing.
.. I often forget that). It was an Ibanez RoadStar II,
black with a white pickguard and those oh-so memorable heart-
shaped tuners. I slap, but it owes more to the Stanley Clarke/
Larry Graham school than the modern-day machine guns of
Wooten and Dickens. Since the moment I picked up a bass, I was
playing with a drummer: if there's any secret I could impart it
would be that. I have two 2000 Rickenbacker 4003s, both jetglo
" I C O U L D N 'T RIGHTLY SAY W H O ' S THE
GREATEST B
a s s i s t
"
with gold anodised aluminum pickguards from Tone-Guard, I'd
have to say to date that these basses are my all-time faves. Hero-
wise, Gene Simmons made want to play bass. Steve Harris, Billy
Sheehan, Geddy Lee and Stu Hamm made want to get better. Paul
McCartney, Jack Bruce, John Entwistle, Chris Squire, and John
Paul Jones made me want to look back. Stanley Clarke and Jaco
Pastorius made want to look deeper. Larry Graham, Flea, Doug
Wimbish and Dug Pinnick made want to groove. Les Claypool
and Mike Watt made me want to explore. And when I found out
who he was, James Jamerson made me remember why I loved
those trips to my aunt's house in New Jersey, listening to WCBS
along the way. I couldn't rightly say who's the greatest bassist. The
older I get and the longer I play it just seems that there are shades
of greatness. If you want to talk tone, then for me the buck stops
with Billy Sheehan on Talas'
Sink Your Teeth Into That.
I once
heard it described as a chainsaw through chocolate pudding, I like
that. Music is the only form of communication that transcends
and defines cultures all at once. It truly is universal. I just released
my first solo album,
Freebassing
, and I'm currently trying to get it
heard - this should help.
www.freebassing.com
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BASS GUITAR MAGAZINE
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