APP EXTRA
C l i c k t o v i e w e x t r a
v i d e o c o n t e n t h e r e
PH
IL MANN
ADVANCED TECHNIQUES
JEDI MANN USES HIS
MIDDLE DIGIT. CALM
DOWN AT THE BACK
L
earning a new instrument
skill is often plagued
with many pitfalls.
However, one of the main
elements that needs to
be acknowledged is the
difference between learning
and practising. W hen you learn
something for the first time you
need to develop a new skill set,
often requiring your body to
perform in a manner that it is
unfamiliar to it.
Breaking down the movement
and excavating each part allows
your brain to make sense of the
task it's being asked to perform:
'W hich string do I pluck at what
moment in order to play that
note?' or 'What is the rhythm
in bar two of the notation?' It's
not until you've unravelled all
manner of issues and learned
the part that you can then begin
to practise it. Learning should
be done slowly, out of time and
efficiently. If you have an issue
with a specific section, break
it down into smaller, more
digestible parts so that you can
understand the process. Only
once you have learned all of the
mechanics can you begin to bring the music to life and practise them. So often I see students attempting
to practise a new piece of music along to a time-keeping device before they've properly learned all of
the factors involved to perform it. The result is messy, with numerous discrepancies that often involve
timing issues. I have no problem with metronomes, but they should only be used at the correct stage of
development, once you've learned all the parts and you are ready to then practise them.
W ith this in mind, let's look at the first exercise of this month's programme. Previously we've been
developing triplets and trying to develop the use of the thumb in our plucking hand, using it to perform
both percussive hits and notated elements. Today we'll introduce the middle finger to our regime:
although initially basic, this first exercise will help you to develop the relationship between thumb, index
and middle fingers. For most this may be a completely new movement, so take it slow.
EXERC
ISE
1
EXERC
ISE
2
Although it's similar to the first exercise, our second string-crossing pattern uses a different
permutation in the plucking hand. In
Exercise 1
we initially struck the fundamental: thumb, index,
middle. This second exercise will require a thumb, middle, index movement. The plucking permutations
that are demonstrated here are transferable movements so once you've mastered the order in exercise
one, perform it over
Exercise 2
and vice versa.
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