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IN BARS 24 TO 25 YOU MAY RECOGNISE A SIGNATURE
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-41---------- 1 2 X 4 3 ----------11---------- 4 2 X 1 3 ----------11---------- 42 X 4 3
40-------- 14X 1 2 -------- W-------- 11X 12
14X12
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and 19th bars, which share
the same rhythm but are a
minor 3rd apart, reflecting the
transposition that occurred with
the two opening melodies. This
type of mirroring throughout
the solo is effective in creating a
sense of familiarity, so that the
listener remains interested as
the solo continues to develop.
The next couple of bars continue
to raise the energy levels before
the ideas descend, and some
double stops occur in bar 22.
These 10ths are rhythmically
based on accenting groups of
five semiquavers, creating a
Cuban cascara pattern, which I
also demonstrated in my column
in the last
BGM .
In bars 24 to 25 you may
recognise a signature Jaco
Pastorius type bass-line, which
creates an almost conga-like
sound as it not only accents the
off-beat but softens the attack
on each beat itself by using
hammer-ons. There is even a
quote from 'Teen Town' thrown
in for good measure as a fill at
the end of bar 25, before the
line climaxes with a harmonic
double stop in the following
bar. Some more displacement
occurs in bars 27 and 28, once
again employing groups of five
semiquavers, this time as groups
of four with a semiquaver
rest inserted between each
subsequent group.
As we have seen, repetition
is not a bad thing as it gives
the listener something to
latch on to. You will note this
happens in bar 29, which is
rhythmically identical and has
exactly the same as the double
stops that occur in bar 23.
There is a however a different
twist here as these syncopated
10ths lead nicely into bar 30,
which dramatically descends
down the chromatic scale, using
octaves to add weight before
finally coming to rest with the
open E string and its octave
bringing the solo at last to a very
satisfying conclusion.
Next month I will be upping
the ante and will be looking
at how we can take the funk
to the next level and create
effective jazz/funk fusion
solos. Hopefully you will find
my method useful and it will
inspire you to create your own
ideas by using this technique as
springboard to launch you into
the stratosphere on your own
funk journey.
82
BASS GUITAR MAGAZINE
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