ALEX WEBSTER
ODD M ETERS? LIKE
B R IT IS H GAS, A LEX
W EB STER FIN D S
THEM FA SCIN ATIN G
I
n this month's column we'll
start to look at one of my
favourite musical subjects:
odd meters. Songs written
using odd meters can sound
a little strange at first.
Most popular Western music
features meters like 4/4 and
3/4, and for that reason we're
probably conditioned to hear
them as normal: they just sound
right. That said, I think once
you become familiar with odd
meters they can feel equally
natural. It's just a matter of
getting comfortable with them
and internalising their feel. With
repetition, even a really odd
pattern can have a great groove.
In the last few columns we've
been working with different
note groupings in some of the
more standard time signatures,
such as 3/4 and 4/4. I thought it
would be a good idea to do that
first, so that you'd be prepared
to work on odd meters. Knowing
how to work with different
groupings of notes will help you
have good timing and feel in any
time signature. Being aware of
that, let's tackle the odd meter
7/8 by looking at some different
EXAMPLE
1
EXAMPLE
2
EXAMPLE
3
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