WANT TO MAKE I I AS A PRQ fESSIDNAL BASSIST?
LISTEN UP AS BGM 'S W ORLD-CLASS BASS TEAM
REPORTS BACK FROM THE TOUR BUS
T H E J A Z Z B A S S I S T
RUTH GOLLER
Jazz warrior Ruth opens her mind.
..
One of the things that I love about playing the bass is that there is
always something new to learn: you can keep adding things that help
you improve. Recently I was explaining to a student of mine how
important it is to rely on your own time, rather than the drummer's
or anyone else's. We were clapping subdivisions over different time
signatures, and he said to me, 'Bass players have to be good at so
many things!' He's right of course: we need to have strong time and
thorough harmonic knowledge. Of course, every musician should
have those things,
but often people
rely on the bass
player for particular
expertise in those
areas. It's very
important to look
deeply into rhythm
and harmony. I
always try and
practise a variety of
exercises and think
about the best way
to perform them. Of
course, sometimes
you may be unsure
about which
direction to choose
and how to focus
your practice. That's
when you should
seek help from a
teacher, or another
expert that you trust: otherwise you may waste time trying to do the
wrong thing, which will get you nowhere. At other times it is very
clear what you should do. Once you've find the right approach to
practice, you'll see almost daily improvements: when this happens,
grab the situation and make the most of it. It's a bit like surfing a
wave and trying to stay on it as long as possible. Recently I had
this experience after talking to a friend who is a master in South
Indian rhythms. At first I wasn't sure whether these patterns were
right for me, as I know nothing about this kind of music, other than
it takes years of very focused practice to master them. However,
my friend gave me a book for beginners, and since then I have
been practising these exercises every day. I have found so many
similarities and exercises that will improve my sense of rhythm. It
really did teach me a lesson on how to be open-minded and to accept
new challenges.
www.soundcloud.com/ruth-goller
T H E M E T A L H E A D
PAOLO GREGOLETTO
Trivium bassist Paolo Gregoletto goes to the movies
Spoilers ahead! When I first heard about the movie
Whiplash,
I had
hoped it was some sort of reference to Metallica, maybe even a
movie about thrash metal. My dreams of an ode to my favourite
metal genre were crushed, however, when the first trailer revealed
itself to be the story of a drum student and his teacher. At the time
I imagined a typical feel-good story, the usual plot arc, and a happy
ending. I was wrong.
“The award for Best Supporting Actor goes to.
..” The intense
W hiplash
montage that played after JK Simmons' name was read from
the list of nominees hooked me. This was hardly the feel-good story
I had imagined - it seemed much darker. After Simmons' acceptance
speech and a few more video clips for later awards, I opened up my
Amazon account and pressed 'Rent this movie'.
I don't want to ruin this incredible film for anyone, so read this
after you watch it! Andrew Neiman is the fresh-faced, first-year drum
student at a New York music school named Shaffer Conservatory. He
is a bit cocky and sure of himself as player, but terribly awkward in
almost every situation outside of his school. I felt this character was
easily relatable to many 'lifer' musicians, myself included. When you
find that music is your outlet, the rest of your life tends to become
secondary. When Andrew begins to experience the resistance from
both his instructor and outside school life, it may as well have been
my band's first few years on tour. No matter how good you think
you are, or what instrument you play, there is going to be a rude
awakening right around the corner - which you won't see coming. To
be continued!
www.trivium.org
0 7 0
b a s s g u it a r m a g a z in e
previous page 69 Bass Guitar 2015 Issue 116 April read online next page 71 Bass Guitar 2015 Issue 116 April read online Home Toggle text on/off